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Al-Qaeda took 41 hostages (open thread)

A group linked with Al-Qaeda attacked and took control of a gas field owned by BP in Algeria. Al-Qaeda took 41 hostages, including at least seven Americans. (Fox News.)


CAPTION: At least seven Americans in group being held at natural gas field

The group of Al-Qaeda call themselves “Katibat Moulathamine” or “Masked Brigade.” Al-Qaeda called a Mauritanian news outlet to say one of its groups carried out the operation on the gas field. They took 41 hostages from nine or 10 different nationalities.

Al Qaeda-linked group holding at least 41 hostages, including at least seven Americans, took control of an Algerian gas field.

Please be sure to read excerpts from the Wall Street Journal article, called “Long Insurgency Gave Rise to al Qaeda-Linked Group.” (It is particularly important since many more details are provided than the Fox News article.)

According to the Wall Street Journal, “Long Insurgency Gave Rise to al Qaeda-Linked Group“:

Some militants refused to give up the fight but Algerian authorities were able to push them to the northern, mountainous region of Kabylie and the south. In late 2006, those militants pledged allegiance to al Qaeda, adopting the name of al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, or AQIM.

Their main assignment was to extend the jihad into Western Europe, said Jean-Pierre Filiu, a professor in the Middle East department at the Paris Institute of Political Studies. Back then, one of Osama bin Laden’s lieutenants had warned that AQIM militants would become “a bone in the throat of U.S. and French crusaders.”

But unable to strike in Europe, the AQIM group focused on Western targets in the Sahara. Crisscrossing borders between Algeria, Mauritania, Mali, Libya and Niger, the group has claimed responsibility for the killing of several Europeans.

The long list of victims includes four French tourists in Mauritania in late 2007, a British tourist in Mali in 2009 and a French aid worker, also in Mali, in 2010.Crisscrossing borders between Algeria, Mauritania, Mali, Libya and Niger, the group has claimed responsibility for the killing of several Europeans.

The long list of victims includes four French tourists in Mauritania in late 2007, a British tourist in Mali in 2009 and a French aid worker, also in Mali, in 2010.

I especially want you to read the full article at the Wall Street Journal, “Long Insurgency Gave Rise to al Qaeda-Linked Group.”

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