“Weary Workers Learn to Count Sheep Using Special Lighting, Office Nap Pods”

  • 74% of workers over 30 who report not getting adequate sleep say that sleepiness affects their work
  • 9% of Americans say they are likely to fall asleep at an inappropriate moment, such as during a meeting or while driving
  • 71% of Americans say they have a television in their bedrooms
  • 11% of those with televisions in the bedroom say they keep the TV on all night
  • 39% of Americans say they have a computer in their bedrooms
  • 40.6 million American workers – 30% of the civilian workforce – sleep less than 6 hours per night (“short sleep duration”)

Continued below.

CAPTION: Sleep-deprived American workers ultimately cost their employers $63 billion in lost productivity, according to a 2011 Harvard Medical School study. Lauren Weber joins The News Hub with a look at some companies making a business case for a better-rested workforce. Photo: Getty Images.

It turns out, according to the Wall Street Journal article, “a good night’s rest is good for business.”

  • The problem is particularly acute for night-shift workers: 44% of them sleep less than 6 hours per night, compared with 28.8% of people who work typical daytime hours
  • Workers between the ages of 30 and 64 were more likely to report short sleep duration; workers over 65 were least likely to report short sleep duration
  • Workers with college degrees or more education were least likely to report short sleep duration
  • […]

  • 23.2% of American workers suffer from insomnia
  • People with insomnia did not report higher levels of absenteeism compared to non-sufferers, but reported significantly higher levels of presenteeism (lower productivity while at work)
  • Workers with insomnia lost an average of 7.8 days of work performance per year …
  • [I]nsomnia costs American companies $63.2 billion

Sources: National Sleep Foundation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and “Insomnia and the Performance of U.S. Workers,” Sleep, 2011

One-third of American workers don’t get enough sleep in order to function at peak levels. Workers’ chronic exhaustion costs companies “billions of dollars in lost productivity, according to researchers from Harvard Medical School.”

According to the Wall Street Journal article, a “good night’s rest is good for business.”

The article further states that about 1/3 of workers in America don’t sleep enough in order to function well. Researcher at Harvard Medical School have found that “chronic exhaustion is costing billions of dollars in lost productivity, according to researchers from Harvard Medical School.”

“Managers at [companies such as] Procter & Gamble Co., PG +0.01% and Goldman Sachs Group Inc., GS +1.04% are waking up to the problem.

“The companies are also investing in programs from sleep-hygiene courses to melatonin-regulating lighting to help employees improve their slumber.

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 40.6 million American workers, or 30% of the civilian workforce, don’t get enough rest. And the Harvard scientists estimated in 2011 that sleep deprivation costs U.S. companies $63.2 billion in lost productivity per year. …”

Managers struggle to motivate exhausted workers. During busy holiday periods at the Park Hyatt Beaver Creek resort in Avon, Colo., long hours sometimes lead to short fuses among staff. “You have to try to figure out who’s feeling frustrated and help them cut loose to get some rest,” said Scott Gubrud, director of sales and marketing at the hotel, which last week began a series of better-sleep initiatives for both employees and guests.

“If we treated machinery like we treat the human body, there would be breakdowns all the time,” said James Maas, a former Cornell University psychologist and author of “Sleep for Success.”

The WSJ article added:

Managers at a growing number of concerns, among them Procter & Gamble Co., PG +0.01% and Goldman Sachs Group Inc., GS +1.04% are waking up to the problem, investing in programs from sleep-hygiene courses to melatonin-regulating lighting to help employees improve their slumber.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 40.6 million American workers, or 30% of the civilian workforce, don’t get enough rest. And the Harvard scientists estimated in 2011 that sleep deprivation costs U.S. companies $63.2 billion in lost productivity per year, mainly because of “presenteeism,” people showing up for work but operating at subpar levels. …

Read more at the Wall Street Journal‘s article, article, “Weary Workers Learn to Count Sheep Using Special Lighting, Office Nap Pods.”

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